B-Roll of a U.S. Navy E-2C Hawkeye

Military : 24 Hours - The Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye is an American all-weather, carrier-capable tactical airborne early warning (AEW) aircraft. This twin-turboprop aircraft was designed and developed during the late 1950s and early 1960s by the Grumman Aircraft Company for the United States Navy as a replacement for the earlier, piston-engined E-1 Tracer, which was rapidly becoming obsolete. The aircraft's performance has been upgraded with the E-2B, and E-2C versions, where most of the changes were made to the radar and radio communications due to advances in electronic integrated circuits and other electronics. The fourth major version of the Hawkeye is the E-2D, which first flew in 2007. The E-2 was the first aircraft designed specifically for its role, as opposed to a modification of an existing airframe, such as the Boeing E-3 Sentry. Variants of the Hawkeye have been in continuous production since 1960, giving it the longest production run of any carrier-based aircraft. The E-2 also received the nickname "Super Fudd" because it replaced the E-1 Tracer "Willy Fudd". In recent decades, the E-2 has been commonly referred to as the "Hummer" because of the distinctive sounds of its turboprop engines, quite unlike that of turbojet and turbofan jet engines. In addition to U.S. Navy service, smaller numbers of E-2s have been sold to the armed forces of Egypt, France, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Singapore and Taiwan. INDIAN OCEAN (Nov. 20, 2017) Sailors launch and recover an E-2C Hawkeye, assigned to the Sunkings of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Theodore Roosevelt is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Janine F. Jones/Released) B-Roll of a U.S. Navy E-2C Hawkeye attached to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 117 taking off from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, for exercise Northern Edge 2017, May 8, 2017. This exercise is Alaska’s largest and premier joint training exercise designed to practice operations, techniques and procedures as well as enhance interoperability among the services. The exercise provides real-world proficiency in detection and tracking of units at sea, in the air and on land and response to multiple crises in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Lance Cpl. Andy Martinez) Our Channel : www.youtube.com/channel/UCUKprI6BXu1axsy9-lfp8Qw
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